User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Parrots in Cars

 
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Afford's Avatar


    Parrots in Cars

    When traveling along with your parrot during an automotive, is it safer to own the parrot during a travel cage or sitting out on a perch? during a minor automotive crash, I'd suppose that a parrot would be comfortable during a cage. Since the parrot goes to fall and hit one thing, striking the facet of a cage and being contained therein house seems to be safer.
    Last edited by Afford; 11-24-2018 at 11:45 AM.

  2. The following user likes this post:

    Dragonlady2 (11-24-2018)

  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Casper's 2nd best friend's Avatar


    Parrots

    Casper, a blue fronted Amazon. Loves banana. Hates plastic bags and red coats.
    Parrots must be kept in a suitable cage which itself is secured to stop it moving when being driven in an automobile.
    good reasons why:
    They may distract or obstruct the driver thus causing an accident.
    If they are on an uncaged perch and the vehicle is in an accident with violent g forces the bird becomes a missile which is quite capable of causing serious injury to a person in the car.
    It also applies that all human passengers including those in the rear of the vehicle should wear seat belts. An unbelted back seat passenger could quite easily be thrown forward and kill the person seated in front of them.
    In the UK for many years the amount of people killed in cars was reducing because more and more people were obeying the law by using seat belts. Unfortunately since the introduction of air bags people have a belief that they are safe and don't need seat belts. The statistics prove that this is a false presumption because the number of passengers being killed because they are not wearing seat belts has increased.
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-45675928
    "A busy beak is a happy beak" - David Strom

  4. The following 4 users like this post:

    Dragonlady2 (11-24-2018), kendrafitz (11-25-2018), Lady (12-12-2018), PlaxMacaws (11-25-2018)

  5. #3
    Super Moderator
    Dragonlady2's Avatar


    Parrots

    Willy-Eclectus, Oliver-alexandrine,Mookie-Senegal,Bella- Australian King,Joey and Peewee- Barrabands, Peachiegirl-Peachfront conure,Pepper- crimson belly conure, Peanut-plum head, Babyblue-parrotlette, Harry and Louie-canaries.
    Definitely agree that parrots should be in a secured carrier for all of the reasons posted above. Great question.

  6. The following 3 users like this post:

    Casper's 2nd best friend (11-24-2018), kendrafitz (11-25-2018), PlaxMacaws (11-25-2018)

  7. #4
    Senior Member
    kendrafitz's Avatar


    Parrots

    Rosie, our Greenwing Macaw (Hatchday 4/1/12)
    I agree as well. We have a travel carrier which I strap in. I also usually move the seat a bit so the carrier doesn’t move at all.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Rosie & Kendra


  8. The following 3 users like this post:

    Casper's 2nd best friend (11-25-2018), Dragonlady2 (11-25-2018), PlaxMacaws (11-25-2018)

  9. #5
    Senior Member
    Casper's 2nd best friend's Avatar


    Parrots

    Casper, a blue fronted Amazon. Loves banana. Hates plastic bags and red coats.
    We usually use an estate car (English term for station wagon) when travelling with Casper. I strap the cage onto a small pallet so it is raised up and Casper can watch the world go by. It is not possible to do this in our ordinary cars but I recently realised that our soft top Saab has rear seats that fold down to a load platform. It has a very hard, sporty ride though and would probably shake all his feathers out.
    We stop every couple of hours if it is a long journey so that he can rest from having to hold on tight. He does snooze on motorways but we have to wake him up before the tight turn on the off-ramp. Arriving in the dark after a long journey one time I looked in the rear view mirror to see him hanging upside down from the roof of the cage. I suppose he was bored.
    "A busy beak is a happy beak" - David Strom

  10. The following 3 users like this post:

    Dragonlady2 (11-25-2018), kendrafitz (11-25-2018), PlaxMacaws (11-25-2018)

  11. #6
    Senior Member
    Casper's 2nd best friend's Avatar


    Parrots

    Casper, a blue fronted Amazon. Loves banana. Hates plastic bags and red coats.
    Homing instinct
    Casper does seem to have an awareness of where we are and where we are going. He gets excited when we are going in the direction of the vets (strangely he likes going there)
    and always perks up when we are near home, even in the dark.
    Does anyone else notice this with their own birds?
    Which makes me wonder about birds that escape and fly off, maybe they are not happy where they were?
    "A busy beak is a happy beak" - David Strom

  12. The following user likes this post:

    Dragonlady2 (11-25-2018)

  13. #7
    Super Moderator
    Dragonlady2's Avatar


    Parrots

    Willy-Eclectus, Oliver-alexandrine,Mookie-Senegal,Bella- Australian King,Joey and Peewee- Barrabands, Peachiegirl-Peachfront conure,Pepper- crimson belly conure, Peanut-plum head, Babyblue-parrotlette, Harry and Louie-canaries.
    A lot of parrots are clipped because people think that limits their flight. What it also does is create a dependency on their human flock member to get them around and to feed them. It doesn’t foster resilience, IMO. So when a parrot escapes or is spooked and flies away from its home, I believe it’s due to lack of experience in responding to unexpected stressors. I also feel that my Joey or Pepper, my most bonded birds to me, would be lost if they were to “escape” outside due to confusion and lack of experience outside. Just my thoughts.

  14. The following 2 users like this post:

    Casper's 2nd best friend (11-25-2018), kendrafitz (11-26-2018)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •